Free cannabis testing for ACT home growers

September 16, 2022

Residents in the Canberra region will be able to anonymously submit their home-grown cannabis for testing as part of a University of Sydney study to examine the outcomes of laws that decriminalised cannabis in the Australian Capital Territory in 2020. The university’s Lambert Initiative for Cannabinoid Therapeutics is launching its flagship CAN-ACT study of ACT residents who grow, possess, and use small quantities of cannabis for both medicinal and non-medicinal purposes. The first element of the study is an anonymous online survey to investigate cannabis use, behaviours and attitudes among ACT residents, followed by an invitation to anonymously submit home-grown cannabis for testing. The cannabis collected from growers’ homes will be analysed for cannabis content, including its main psychoactive components – tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and non-intoxicating cannabidiol (CBD) – as well as a range of other cannabinoids and biologically active molecules, free of charge. Participants will be able to view, anonymously, the analysis results from their cannabis samples online.

Residents in the Canberra region will be able to anonymously submit their home-grown cannabis for testing as part of a University of Sydney study to examine the outcomes of laws that decriminalised cannabis in the Australian Capital Territory in 2020.

The university’s Lambert Initiative for Cannabinoid Therapeutics is launching its flagship CAN-ACT study of ACT residents who grow, possess, and use small quantities of cannabis for both medicinal and non-medicinal purposes. Growing cannabis at home is currently prohibited in all other Australian states and territories.

The first element of the study is an anonymous online survey to investigate cannabis use, behaviours and attitudes among ACT residents, followed by an invitation to anonymously submit home-grown cannabis for testing.

The cannabis collected from growers’ homes will be analysed for cannabis content, including its main psychoactive components – tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and non-intoxicating cannabidiol  (CBD) –  as well as a range of other cannabinoids and biologically active molecules, free of charge.  Participants will be able to view, anonymously, the analysis results from their cannabis samples online.

The source of this news is from University of Sydney

Popular in Research

1

3 days ago

MIT scientists discover new antiviral defense system in bacteria

2

3 days ago

Algorithm learns to correct 3D printing errors for different parts, materials and systems

3

3 days ago

Do not try this at home: Medieval medicine under the spotlight in major new project

4

3 days ago

The doctor turned detective investigating the imprints of cancer

5

3 days ago

Drought and climate change

Drone Strikes Headquarters Of Russia's Black Sea Fleet In Ukraine's Occupied Crimea Region

1 day ago

North Korea fires ballistic missile over Japan and Tokyo urges residents to EVACUATE

1 day ago

Shadow RBA says no respite on interest rates

1 day ago

Allen Weisselberg, longtime Trump executive, pleads guilty to tax fraud

2 days ago

Power, laws, and planning

1 day ago

How can families help kids better manage Year 12 exam stress?

1 day ago