Can aviation be sustainable?

January 11, 2023

MR is a particular research strength at Cambridge – it’s also used to develop next-generation batteries, another vital technology in the energy transition. At their Energy Transition Campus in Amsterdam, Shell has lab-scale Fischer-Tropsch reactors to help them understand the overall reaction process. These reactors are somewhat like black boxes, and until now it has not been possible to probe the chemistry occurring inside the reactors, which makes optimising sustainable fuels in these reactors difficult. For example, monitoring the evolution of hydrocarbon chain length growth enables researchers to better understand how to optimise the final product for use as an aviation fuel. These experiments provide valuable data to fuel companies, helping accelerate the transition to sustainable fuels.

The researchers use magnetic resonance (MR) methods – including imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (NMR) – to further understand the Fischer-Tropsch reaction, which is a key technical process in one of the possible production routes for SAF. MR is a particular research strength at Cambridge – it’s also used to develop next-generation batteries, another vital technology in the energy transition.

For several years, the Cambridge researchers have been using NMR and MRI to better understand the chemistry and engineering processes inside a working Fischer-Tropsch reactor, where syngas – a combination of carbon monoxide and hydrogen – is converted into the hydrocarbon molecules which form the basis of liquid aviation fuel.

At their Energy Transition Campus in Amsterdam, Shell has lab-scale Fischer-Tropsch reactors to help them understand the overall reaction process. These reactors are somewhat like black boxes, and until now it has not been possible to probe the chemistry occurring inside the reactors, which makes optimising sustainable fuels in these reactors difficult. At Cambridge however, it’s possible to see inside the black box.

“At the end of the Fischer-Tropsch process, you have something that’s chemically similar to jet fuel,” said Professor Mick Mantle, also from the Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology. “We use NMR and MRI to better understand what’s happening at a molecular level during the Fischer-Tropsch process.”

Using NMR techniques, the Cambridge researchers can monitor in real time the evolution of chemical product formation inside the Fischer-Tropsch reactor under realistic industrial conditions. For example, monitoring the evolution of hydrocarbon chain length growth enables researchers to better understand how to optimise the final product for use as an aviation fuel. These experiments provide valuable data to fuel companies, helping accelerate the transition to sustainable fuels.

A key advance of the work being done by the Cambridge group is the use of high-resolution MRI imaging, which provides reaction measurements inside individual catalyst pellets within the reactor. This provides unrivalled local information about the actual conditions under which the reaction is occurring.

“Our research is fundamental, in terms of providing the physical and chemical expertise to the companies who will ultimately make SAF at scale,” said Mantle.

“Here in Cambridge, we have a unique capability when it comes to imaging reactors at realistic conditions,” said Sederman. “We can observe reactions in real time and can then work out how to optimise them.”

“Companies in the traditional energy sector have realised that they have to be part of the energy transition themselves and be part of the solution – that’s what both academic researchers and industrial chemical engineers should be doing,” said Mantle.

“The collaboration with Shell brings together their industrial experts with our research expertise and enables us to make unique advances to these real-world problems facing us,” said Sederman.

“This is hopefully good for our research, but if we can help develop these processes it can also be good for the planet.”

The source of this news is from University of Cambridge

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